Keynotes

Keynotes

The symposium will feature 5 keynote talks, research talks by selected participants and demos of new prototype tools. We will also feature short (chit-chat) talks by PhD students to foster the exchange of new and emerging ideas. The program will provide ample opportunities for small working groups to discuss topics of the symposium theme.

Keynotes will be given by: (in alphabetical order)

The detailed program will be available real soon. Please stay tuned!

Ahmed Hassan, Queen's University, Canada
Mobile Software Engineering: The Next Revolution?

Abstract

Today a new revolution surrounding the development of mobile applications is in the making. These applications are truly challenging how software is being developed, marketed, and maintained. Yet their diminutive size leads many to regard them as toy systems. Alarmingly, the reaction of the software engineering community to mobile applications draws many parallels to its decade-long reaction to web applications -- The rigor and realism of web applications continues to be debated with research in their development almost non-existent within the top software engineering research venues. In this talk, I plan to emphasize the importance of mobile applications, and the challenges facing developers working on them. I will then summarize some of our recent research progress for mobile applications that are built for the world’s top three mobile platforms (Blackberry, iOS, and Android).

Short Bio

Ahmed E. Hassan is the NSERC/Blackberry Software Engineering Chair at the School of Computing in Queen's University. Dr. Hassan spearheaded the organization and creation of the Mining Software Repositories (MSR) conference and its research community. He co-edited special issues of the IEEE Transaction on Software Engineering and the Journal of Empirical Software Engineering on the MSR topic. Early tools and techniques developed by Dr. Hassan's team are already integrated into products used by millions of users worldwide. Dr. Hassan industrial experience includes helping architect the Blackberry wireless platform, and working for IBM Research at the Almaden Research Lab and the Computer Research Lab at Nortel Networks. Dr. Hassan is the named inventor of patents at several jurisdictions around the world including the United States, Europe, India, Canada, and Japan. More information at: http://sail.cs.queensu.ca/

Audris Mockus, Avaya Labs Research, USA
"Quantifying and Conveying Risk in Software Development"

Abstract

Risk assessment and mitigation may appear to be dull activities which are remote from software developers' daily tasks. However, the bulk of developers' work either implicitly or explicitly involves managing social and technical risks. Tools and practices could help determine the most effective course of action in distributed development and other contexts, where information necessary to assess the underlying risk is inaccessible. The talk will outline some approaches used in industry to quantify and reduce the risk posed by lost expertise and vexed customers. The talk will argue that the perspective of risk reduction is both not dull and likely to bring a plethora of much-needed tools and approaches to improve software development and support activities.

Short Bio

Audris Mockus studies software development and related phenomena through the recovery, documentation, and analysis of digital remains. Such digital traces reflect projections of collective and individual activity. He uses these projections to reconstruct reality by employing a three-dimensional approach: 1) summarize and augment digital traces by designing data cleaning methods, 2) explore the behavior of individuals and teams via visualization techniques, and 3) measure, understand, and influence individual and collective behavior using statistical models and optimization techniques. Audris Mockus received B.S. and M.S. in Applied Mathematics from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology in 1988. In 1991 he received M.S. and in 1994 he received Ph.D. in Statistics from Carnegie Mellon University. He works at Avaya Labs Research. Previously he worked at Software Production Research Department of Bell Labs.

Emerson Murphy-Hill, North Carolina State University, USA
"Helping Developers Find Useful Tools"

Abstract

Software developers have thousands of tools at their fingertips, but an individual developer will use only a small fraction of them. Some of the tools will be useless to the developer while others may be very useful, but a developer has only limited time to learn new tools tools. In this talk, I discuss the challenges that developers face in maintaining awareness of useful tools, as well as some solutions, including recommending commands that a developer is not using, but should be; giving a developer the benefits of a tool without having to know the tool exists; and connecting developers with peers who already use useful tools.

Short Bio

Emerson is an assistant professor at North Carolina State University. His research interests include the intersection between human-computer interaction and software engineering. In 2010, completed a post-doc with Gail Murphy at the University of British Columbia. He completed a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Portland State University in 2009 under Andrew P. Black. He holds a B.S. from the Evergreen State College. You can find his webpage at: http://people.engr.ncsu.edu/ermurph3/.

Martin Robillard, McGill University, Canada
"Recommending API Documentation"

Abstract

Many on-line resources are available to help developers use Application Programming Interfaces (APIs): reference documentation, tutorials, forum posts, etc. These resources can only be useful if they are retrieved efficiently and at the right time. Recommender systems can help bridge the gap between on-line resources and the information needs of developers. However, a major challenge for analyzing natural-language API documentation is to resolve the code elements contained in documents. Code elements mentioned in documents are rarely fully qualified, so readers need to understand the context in which they are mentioned. This talk will present our recent work to develop highly-accurate techniques for resolving informal references to code elements in developer documentation, the recommendation systems that such techniques support, and the research challenges ahead.

Short Bio

Martin Robillard is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at McGill University. His current research focuses on the automated analysis of software development artifacts to support programming activities. He is the recipient of four ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Awards. He recently served as the Program Co-Chair for the 20th ACM SIGSOFT International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering, and is currently serving on the editorial boards of the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering and Empirical Software Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of British Columbia.

Laurie Williams, North Carolina State University, USA
"Where Should I Look? Using Metrics to Prioritize Verification Efforts"

Abstract

Software developers never have enough time to search for and fix the faults in their programs. Therefore, techniques are needed to prioritize efforts to make this precious bug finding time as efficient as possible. In this talk I will talk about two techniques for making fault finding more efficient based models built from metrics. The first is a technique for finding the true positive alerts from those reported by automated static analysis tools. The second is for locating security vulnerabilities in code so that inspection and testing efforts can be focused in these areas.

Short Bio

Laurie Williams is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at North Carolina State University (NCSU), USA. Her research focuses on software security particularly in relation to healthcare IT; agile software development practices and processes; software reliability, and software testing and analysis. Laurie is a co-director of the NCSU Science of Security Lablet sponsored by the US National Security Agency. Laurie received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Utah, her MBA from Duke University Fuqua School of Business, and her BS in Industrial Engineering from Lehigh University. She worked for IBM Corporation for nine years in Raleigh, NC and Research Triangle Park, NC before returning to academia. You can find her webpage at: http://collaboration.csc.ncsu.edu/laurie/.